bandwagon

bandwagon

The graphics design blogoshpere has gotten stupid lately. There is this trend now (and people are actually making money from doing this) to link to other sites that offer design resources and tutorials. I’m sick of going to design blogs and seeing lists of posts with titles like, “10 Very Useful Photoshop Tutorials” or, “Amazing Digital Paintings to Inspire You” or, “60+ Totally Free Rusted Metal Textures for Designers.” Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for pointing out great posts on other blogs, but it seems that there are only like three sites that actually create original content. The rest just point to those sites. There are very talented people contributing some great resources to the design community and do so for free. Is it really fair that these talented people do all the hard work while others just throw up a few links on their site and make money off of adverts? Sure, give me a link to a great site or resource that you find, but don’t ONLY do that. That’s what search engines are for… Update 13/09/2009 @ 22:32 – Looks like I’m not the only one what feels this way. The CSS Guy over at Ask the CSS Guy wrote (a pretty funny) post about the same thing called, “59+ Amazing (and jaw-dropping) web design-related lists with titles that will rip your face off, blow your mama’s mind, and make you cry under the crushing pain of their inspiration.” Good...
multitask

multitask

Craig Buckler over at Sitepoint.com wrote an interesting article about how people that multitask are actually less productive than those that don’t. According to his article, a study conducted over at Stanford University showed that people that multitask have limited attention spans and are easily distracted. People that do not multitask, on the other hand, seemed to score better on the test conducted at Stanford. I can see why this might be true. Given my own experience, I often find myself distracted from the tasks that I’m doing only to discover hours later that I’ve been off an a tangent. But I don’t think that the tests reflect what goes on in the workplace. The test measured memory and how well subjects could recall the information that they’ve seen. Non-multitaskers did better because they could focus only on the specific information they were showed, while multitaskers tried to absorb everything they saw. In reality, in the workplace for example, any multitasker worth the water he’s composed of, would have a system in place that would help him organize and track all the information he encounters. The point, I’m trying to make is that effective multitasking doesn’t rely on memory, it relys on how to deal with information at the appropriate time. So while the study is interesting and has some valid points, I don’t think that it reflects any real world scenarios. In the movie, Memento, Leonard couldn’t create any new memories and yet still managed to find his wife’s killer all because of the system he used to organize information (I know it’s just a movie, but I...
Done

Done

So David Allen has kinda sorta changed how people increase their productivity. His Getting Things Done method is said to have revolutionized the way people, well… get things done. Despite GTD’s raging success, it has been met with some critisism, however, the most prominent of which is that GTD is too inflexible and impracticle to be implemented easily. While I agree, I think that GTD is not meant to be followed evangelistically. Rather, GTD should be thought of as a set of guidelines that should be implemented so that it fits into the way you work. Even David Allen has said that he falls off the GTD bandwagon every once in a while. The point of this post, however, isn’t to defend or slam the GTD system. It is to give the seven of you reading this my take on David Allen’s methods and how I’ve implemented them into my daily workflow. So, GTD’s major priciple (and the reason why I believe it works) is that you must empty your mind of all tasks by recording them externally. This external device must be something reliable so that information is not lost (and so that your subconcious knows that it wont be). This way, instead of remembering what you need to do, you can focus more on getting those tasks done. Allen suggests that the simple act of “unloading” your mind is enough to relieve most of the stress that hinders actual productivity. The unconcious mind is therefore free of anxiety so that the concious mind can focus on completing tasks. The first step to implementing GTD is to identify where...
pilfer

pilfer

The following is a list of things that have been stolen from me since I opened pixelPLAY three years ago: A whole computer tower 6 x 2MB RAM chips More than 10 Logitech MX518 Gaming Mice (I recovered two of them) Playstation Portable Security camera (ironic isn’t it?) Epson high-def projector You’d think I’d...
Identity

Identity

So… the three of you reading this must have noticed that I updated the design of my blog (finally!). Kinda simple but far from done. I’m not even going to try to support older browsers with this one. If it works, it works. If not, you’ll get a jumbled mess. You shouldn’t even be using any browser older than 6 months anyway. While thinking about the site and what kind of stuff will go on here, I figured my experience doing web stuff is kinda extensive, so I might as well add posts related to web design, graphics, etc… If not for you three, but for me as a reference in the future because I tend to forget things easily. So expect to see posts about me, about my work, and about me working. I’m sure I’ll keep you at the edge of your...
Immortality

Immortality

I was chatting with my friend the other day. The conversation started with “Whopper Virgins” (I know I’m late with this) and ended on a conversation about free will and if it actually exists. If you are religious, man is supposed to have been granted free will by God. But God is also omnipotent, so doesn’t that cancel out free will? Complicated issue to say the least, but I’m not a religious scholar to be able to argue about the intricacies and interpretations of written scripture so I’m not even going to go there. However, the scientist in me has thought about this issue for a long time now, and I’m come to one simple conclusion… THERE IS NO FREE WILL The three of you reading this will no doubt be thinking, “What the hell is he talking about?” Well, putting religion and the notion of a supreme omnipotent being to one side for the sake of argument, scientifically, it stands to reason that we as individuals would be free to choose our own destinies. However, this is scientifically impossible. Modern science has been in search of an all encompassing universal equation that will describe the universe and all the mechanics that drive it, from a molecular standpoint all the way up to a planetary level. With this complex equation, one would be able to account for with exact certainty the various properties of every single particle of the universe. It will also be able to predict what those properties will be in a future date. So how does the universal equation take away free will? Well if you can predict where every particle...